Getting your Delegates in a Row

In brilliant public relations style, Marjorie told the future President to include Negroes in any relevant public appearance. She reminded him that while her firm would work at the staff level when it came to civil rights moves proposed by him, she retained the right to speak to him directly if she disagreed with the consensus.
An exceptionally savvy practitioner of political public relations, Marjorie formally joined the Presidential campaign in 1960 as a civil rights adviser.
JFK depended on the Lawsons for their advice and strategy on winning the black vote.
The Lawsons delivered.

Campaign Comment

Last summer I worked on a campaign in Massachusetts’ District Six. I had the pleasure of working with veteran campaigner Maura Flynn (now President-Elect, Dermatology Nurses’ Association) and candidate Marisa DeFranco. It […]

Marjorie McKenzie Lawson

Marjorie McKenzie Lawson was an exceptional Woman of Washington. Born in 1912, she graduated from college as a Social Worker, before studying law at both Terrell and Columbia Universities. After her marriage to Belford V. Lawson, Jr., she joined his law practice at 2001 Eleventh Street, NW. For over six decades, she was a fixture on the District of Columbia political scene, and was equally well-known on Martha’s Vineyard where she kept a house.